How to make an apron pattern

After evaluating the items in my shop, I decided that I wanted to create pot holders with a matching apron. While I have apron patterns, none of them fit the bill. Also, many commercial pattern manufacturers specify that their patterns are not to be used for commercial purposes. That means using them in the process of creating something for sale.

I decided to create my own apron pattern. How hard could it be? To create a starting point I pulled some aprons out of a drawer in the kitchen. All of these aprons were purchased at different times. I decided to make a matrix of the apron measurements. Here's the list of the different measurements I took from each apron:

A. width at the top of the apron

B. length of the curve from the top to the ties

C. length from the ties to the bottom hem

D. width at the bottom of the apron

E. length of the apron from the top to the bottom

F. length of the neck ties

G. length from the top to the level of the ties

H. length of the ties

Once I had those measurements I had to decide what measurements would fit my purposes the best. Before I could start drawing out the pattern I also had to decide on the seam allowance for the hems all the way around.

With the final dimensions in hand, I taped two pieces of tracing paper together. I marked the points for the edge of the bottom hem and the top of the upper hem. At those locations I drew a line for their respective widths. I marked the length from the ties to the bottom hem. Then came a tricky bit, I needed to ma

rk the curve (B). Fortunately I have a flexible ruler (not a measuring tape). I moved the ruler around until I had a pleasing curve, and drew a line along the ruler. Almost done, I wrote notes on the pattern to indicate seam allowances plus other needed items to cut. For the ties I just wrote down lengths and widths. I also wrote down the dimensions for a pocket.

Now to test out the pattern I pulled fabric from my stash, two lengths of plaid - a green plaid and a red plaid. Purely by accident I lay the pattern following the length of the fabric. This allowed me to cut all of the ties from the same length of fabric. (Note to self from later on: this is the most efficient use of fabric when cutting ties using the same fabric.) I scrounged enough fabric for the pocket from the two fabrics for a pocket and two pot holders.

Since my stash included fabric used in the creation of previously created pot holders, I decided to update my products and create a coordinating apron wherever I could. To date I have made 4 aprons, with 3 more on the way. In the meantime I have deactivated the coordinating pot holders. Once I take photos of new apron/pot holder collections, I will reactivate the listings.

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